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United States Air Force Will No Longer Reject Recruits Over Past Marijuana Use

United States Air Force Will No Longer Reject Recruits Over Past Marijuana Use

Politics

United States Air Force Will No Longer Reject Recruits Over Past Marijuana Use

The Unites States Air Force will be making changes to its recruitment policy. Recruiters will no longer ask questions about prior marijuana use.

The United States Air Force has had a reputation for being the hardest branch to get into. In fact, potential recruits were even asked about their history of marijuana use. However, the United States Air Force is moving with the shift in public opinion on marijuana. Two-thirds of cops believe cannabis laws should be relaxed. Even the President of the United States said that weed should be treated like cigarettes and alcohol. Since most states have some form of legal marijuana, the Unites States Air Force will be making some significant changes to its recruitment policy. Now, recruiters will no longer be asking questions about prior marijuana use.

Can The United States Air Force Smoke Weed?

United States Air Force Will No Longer Reject Recruits Over Past Marijuana Use

Active military is still forbidden from using marijuana. Also, any recruits with substance abuse disorders will still be kicked out of the military. Some recruiters were more lenient than others in the past.

“Standards of pre-accession marijuana use were different for getting into the Air Force Academy the United States Air Force Recruiting service for enlistment or officer training school vs. AFROTC” said Air Force spokesperson Zachary Anderson.

“We didn’t ask the same questions. Some recruiters used if you smoked marijuana less than five times, sometimes it was less than 15 times,” added Lt. Gen. Gina Grosso, deputy chief of staff for the United States Air Force.

The simplest way to get around this rule was just to say no when they ask you if you ever tried marijuana. However, some recruits may not know they could be disqualifying themselves from service by admitting their pot history.

Can Medical Marijuana Card Holders Join The United States Air Force?

United States Air Force Will No Longer Reject Recruits Over Past Marijuana Use

While the United States Air Force will no longer factor in when a potential recruit used cannabis, continuous medical purposes is a different story. Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Mark Ediger, surgeon general of the United States Air Force told Green Rush Daily “any condition that would require a prescription for medical marijuana would probably be a disqualifying condition, to begin with.”

The military has been trying to keep up with the times while having the largest possible pool to pick recruits from. In 2011, the Obama administration, House, and Senate passed the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell Repeal Act. The act officially removed any restrictions on LGBTQ military personnel.

The latest move by the United States Air Force gives prospective airmen with asthma and ADHD a shot at joining. It will be on a case-by-case basis, but it will help expand their ranks.

Now, potential recruits that would have been rejected for marijuana use in the past will also be free from several former restrictions. They want a “broad scope of individuals” who “are eligible to serve,” said Chief Master Sergeant of the United States Air Force James Cody.

“As medical capabilities have improved and laws have changed, the Air Force is evolving so we are able to access more worldwide deployable Airmen to conduct the business of our nation,” the United States Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David told Green Rush Daily.

Final Hit

United States Air Force Will No Longer Reject Recruits Over Past Marijuana Use

So, if you’re planning to join the United States Air Force someday, you don’t have to worry about smoking weed before joining. Just make sure your last toke is before joining. Lt. General Grosso reminds airmen that once you’re in, any marijuana use discovered will automatically have you removed from the United States Air Force.

Ab Hanna

Ab is a New York based Green Rush Daily staff writer. During his time at Stony Brook University, he specialized in advanced research and analytical writing. He attends glass art shows supporting independent artists and stays up to date with the latest product innovations.

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