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See Weed’s Devastating Effects on Dogs That Ate Pot

Dogs high on marijuana

Culture

See Weed’s Devastating Effects on Dogs That Ate Pot

Now that medical marijuana is legal in 23 states, pot-infused edibles are more common than ever.

In fact, marijuana edibles may account for half of 2015’s $5.4 billion in legal weed sales.

With all those “special” treats lying around, it’s to be expected that pets are getting their paws on their owner’s pot.

The scene of stoned dogs is one that’s becoming increasingly common in homes across America.

And now, people are uploading videos of their crazed cannabis canines online. The effects are often devastating, with dogs losing coordination, awareness, or just passing out.

No one knows that better than Sam Smeltzer, whose 10-year-old dog, Rasko, ate some of Sam’s medical marijuana-infused coconut oil that dripped on the floor.

“Suddenly I hear licking, and I was like ‘Oh no!’” After about an hour, Rasko was stoned and stumbling around.

“He’s wiggling back and forth, wiggling at us, and his eyes were all glazed,” Smetlzer laughed.

Other videos show dogs completely unresponsive and lying on the floor. Others feature dogs that are spazzing out. Some just find a sturdy wall to lean on and settle themselves.

Marijuana intoxication is a real danger to pets, but it’s very rare that a dog could ingest enough cannabis to suffer long-term health consequences. It’s even rarer for a dog to die from a lethal overdose of cannabis.

Fatality from marijuana exposure was almost unheard of until the development of medical grade marijuana products.

But virtually any amount of marijuana is too much for dogs, and it may lead to behaviors that could endanger your dog’s life.

https://youtu.be/btDLmu4byLI

Pets that are exposed to marijuana commonly display anxiety and disorientation; looking like they’re going through “bad trips”. Intoxicated pets may lack the coordination necessary to consume food and water, which could be very dangerous.

Another risk is posed because cannabis intoxication in canines appears clinically similar to other, more serious forms of poisoning.

However, most animals recover from marijuana toxicity over a period of several hours.

Adam Drury

Adam is a staff writer for Green Rush Daily who hails from Corvallis, Oregon. He’s an artist, musician, and higher educator with deep roots in the cannabis community. His degrees in literature and psychology drive his interest in the therapeutic use of cannabis for mind and body wellness.

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