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Take Your Munchies To Another Level With This Miniature Food Art

Take Your Munchies To Another Level With This Miniature Food Art

Munchies

Take Your Munchies To Another Level With This Miniature Food Art

It’s no secret that many cannabis strains lead to uncontrollable urges for food. With that being said, what better way to tap into a creative high than with miniature food art?

The ever-expanding world of miniature food art is a concept foreign to many. Some find it pointless, others simply a tease. But after smoking popular creative strains like Blue Dream, AK-47, or Trainwreck, your brain wants to eat and create. I think this is your niche.

A Unique Art Form – Miniature Food Art

Take Your Munchies To Another Level With This Miniature Food Art

Being an artist myself, food art intrigues me. Always focusing on 2-dimensional works on canvas and paper, I never thought to branch out to an art form like this. Its process requires incredible patience and a very good eye for detail.

For these reasons, I do think that it could be the perfect outlet for stoners everywhere. Combining a creative high with a rumbling appetite, food art could become the next big thing!

Whether it be creating dishes from clay while keeping a bag of Cheetos close, or creating actual edible arrangements that can tease you until you’re ready to eat… about 50 of them.

Where Could a Talent Like this Lead?

Take Your Munchies To Another Level With This Miniature Food Art

One of the major arguments surrounding miniature food art is why bother? Many people do it simply because it’s relaxing. However, artists like Stephanie Kilgast have been creating miniature dishes for dollhouse collectors since 2009 and can be seen on her professional website.

Other artists advertise their work on places like Etsy, where they create jewelry featuring miniature food items. Whatever it may be, it doesn’t matter if you make it big in the sculptural world of miniature food art, what’s important is that you still have food left in your cabinet when your high wears off.

Starting Up

Take Your Munchies To Another Level With This Miniature Food Art

It is pretty self-explanatory on starting out with mini edible food art. It’s tricky, but creative minds (yes, drug-induced counts) like to figure out how to minimize ingredients to such a small quantity and create a tasty, low-calorie treat.

But there are some little tricks that I’ll share when getting into the business of creating food likenesses on a miniature level. For fruits with smaller parts or small, round components, micro beads or balled up polymer clay works best. For smaller white crystalline food items, marshmallows work well as they quickly stale.

Overall, air dry or polymer clays are the best when it comes to creating works of miniature food art for display. Other tricks to use during the modeling process are talcum powder for sticky hands, toothbrushes as a firm bristle brush for texturing, and X-acto blades for cutting and shaping. Other useful ideas can be found in this guide from sculptor Nadia Michaux on her site.

The Final Hit

As a quick wrap-up, just know this. Food art is a discipline that we are discussing here because it enhances multiple qualities of a creative-dominant high. It inspires indulgences from the munchies, keeps you busy, and gives you a productive high.

Also, it keeps your brain thinking and working in a drug-induced state. And let’s not forget, they’re just so darn cute! Whether you decide to make them for a 12-course dinner or just creative mini sculptures while diving into a large 3-topping pizza, miniature food art may be your calling.

And who knows, maybe your work could eventually be featured alongside the next major bong exhibit.

Eric Griffin

Eric Griffin is an LA-based writer and artist. His work has been featured in the Huffington Post and past catalogs for the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards.

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