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What Is Dank Weed?

What Is Dank Weed?

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What Is Dank Weed?

So you probably got the sense that dank weed is good weed, but what is dank weed, really? And why does it matter?

The stickiest of the icky, that bomb ass stank weed, that good shit. Dank weed is, in the simplest terms, really good weed. But a particular kind of “good,” with its own signature flavors, smells, and high. If you’ve ever asked yourself, what is dank weed, you’re about to find out.

Dank Weed Overview

What Is Dank Weed?

Knowing high-quality weed from middies is easy if you know what to look for.

Visually, bright electric greens or rich, deep greens mean healthy well-grown bud. Sparkly, crystal trichomes mean rich cannabinoid content and bud that hasn’t been roughed up.

To the touch, great herb should stick to your fingertips and give a little resistance when you squeeze it. It should feel slightly moist, but not wet. Such weed should have an incredibly fresh yet pungent smell.

And it’s those last qualities, moistness and smell, that the term “dank weed” emphasizes. When you cure weed perfectly, it retains that moist, pungent aroma without drying out or being too wet and getting moldy.

If you’re wondering, what is dank weed, you’ll have to go a step further than that. This term implies that those qualities are signs not just of the cannabis’s quality, but also its potency. We’re talking about weed that is good and strong.

So strong, in fact, that it might get you too high. Or at least slightly out of your comfort zone. And in fact, that’s keeping with the dictionary definition of the word, as a “disagreeably” damp and musty-smelling place.

What is Dank Weed? The History of Dank Weed

What Is Dank Weed?

The origins of the term are somewhat mysterious. When exactly the Middle English word of Scandinavian origin became the moniker for seriously good weed is anyone’s guess.

A long time ago, “dank” meant a marshy spot, before finding itself in more regular use as a “disagreeably damp, musty, and typically cold” place, according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

There are plenty of basement and cellar grow operations out there. And they can produce some great weed, or some average weed, depending on the quality of the setup and skill of the grower.

But the term we’re talking about means good weed, not basement weed. Somewhat ironically, however, dank herb and basements can have similar qualities. A dampness that’s not wet but definitely not dry, and a pungent, earthy aroma.

Dank Weed and Today’s Cannabis Scene

From a certain perspective, the term is probably seeing its final days on the cannabis scene. Or else, it’ll become a shibboleth marking someone from the dreary lands of cannabis prohibition.

In other words, when you have access to businesses that offer such incredible variety of high-potency cannabis products, “dank” becomes obsolete.

Why talk about herb this way when you can walk into a dispensary or store and choose from indicas, sativas, hybrids, hydro, outdoor, organic, local…? Any kind of cannabis you could imagine.

Soon enough, the only people getting excited about dank weed will be teenagers who managed to find something better than middies or schwag weed.

Why Dank Weed Matters

What Is Dank Weed?

Once “dank” became the word for high-quality flower, it wasn’t long before it could be used to describe anything that was awesome. What’s for dinner? Hopefully some d-a-n-k burritos. What’s trending on the internet? Some dank memes, always.

So why does all this matter? It’s simple. Basically, this kind of weed matters because it’s really good.

Today, the word can refer to any and everything, whether it has something to do with cannabis or not. But when it comes to weed, it matters because high-quality cannabis matters.

And there will always be a special place in cannabis culture for the term. And that’s simply because people like sticky, smelly, flavorful herb.

See Also For Dank Weed

Adam Drury

Adam is a staff writer for Green Rush Daily who hails from Corvallis, Oregon. He’s an artist, musician, and higher educator with deep roots in the cannabis community. His degrees in literature and psychology drive his interest in the therapeutic use of cannabis for mind and body wellness.

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