The 9 Biggest Lies About Marijuana Legalization

One of the major factors holding back cannabis legalization is the number of lies about it. Here are the biggest lies about marijuana legalization.

We’ve been led by many to believe the country has a drug problem. As a result, weed has been ranked with the deadliest of substances.

As more facts on cannabis surface, it seems as though we have a drug enforcement problem.

People are facing harsh punishments for behavior that poses slim to no harm. Lies have been used to sway public opinion, and they’re still being used today as reasons to keep weed illegal.

Here are the biggest lies being spread about marijuana.

9. Marijuana Causes Violence

9 Biggest Lies About Marijuana

Just recently, Jeff Sessions told reporters that “current levels of THC in marijuana are very high compared to what they were a few years ago, and we’re seeing real violence around that.”

We’re not sure what one has to do with the other, but it looks like Jeff Sessions is trying to argue against legalization again.

Apparently, his tactics haven’t changed. We want whatever Sessions is smoking on because he doesn’t seem to be living in our reality.

His claims constantly go against research and facts. For example, Denver has one of the highest violent crime rates in the nation.

However, after Colorado legalized marijuana, violent crime dropped by 2.2 percent.

If that isn’t enough, a 2014 study showed no increase in violent crime and “some evidence of decreasing rates of some types of violent crime, namely homicide and assault.”

If he is really trying to persuade Americans that legal weed is a problem he should get his argument straight.

Sometimes the newly appointed Attorney General sounds like he is arguing in favor of legalization.

“You can’t sue somebody for drug debt the only way to get your money is through strong-arm tactics, and violence tends to follow that,” he said.

We wonder if he realizes legalization would stop that kind of violence not cause or add to it.

He is using fake news to sway public opinion away from legalizing cannabis, but advocates are calling him out.

“By talking about marijuana and violence, the attorney general is inadvertently articulating the strongest argument that exists for legalization, which is that it allows regulated markets in a way that prohibition does not,” said Tom Angell, chairman of Marijuana Majority.

Then, people could sue for drug debt instead of resorting to violence. Thanks for the idea Mr. Sessions.